1. manwithoutborders asked: 1, 5, 8, 15, 39

    1| First time I watched my favorite movie

    The first memory that comes to mind is when I was still a toddler.  My babysitter let me watch American Werewolf In London.  One of the best babysitters in the world.  Unfortunately the movie royally freaked me out and said babysitter ended up getting yelled at by my parents. Poor girl lol…

    I’ve been a fan of horror movies ever since.

    5| Best birthday I’ve had

    This is a great question, but I haven’t celebrated my birthday since I was in elementary school.  As a result I don’t actually remember any birthday celebrations.  Kind of a dry answer, but that’s what it is.

    8| Thing i’m most proud of

    Probably that I’ve stuck with exercising and continuing some form of martial arts training even though I haven’t been to the dojo in so long.  I still work the bag, I practice form, I go over the PInan katas and Bassai Dai, I’ve taken up trail running. edit: and other related things but I probably shouldn’t write a book.

    15| Most content in life

    When I was attending university classes.  That was a comfortable way of life, I enjoy learning, and aside from some General Ed classes I could choose most of my classes.  It was also where I began regular karate training, how I went to South Korea and so on.

    I would be a life-long university student if I ever won the lottery.

    39| Thing I wish I’d known earlier

    Heavy question.  There were two potential major turning points in my life, however.  One, I dropped out of high school and that was a really stupid decision.  Two, my life would have been much better in just about every way had I remained at the dojo when I joined as a teenager.

    There are other issues, such as some relationship related situations, that would have gone much better had I known something.  Yet they wouldn’t have occurred in the fist place had either of the two aforementioned scenarios played out otherwise.

  2. Omfg "talk about" is a lot cuter than ask me

    I know most people who follow me are only here for the art but if anyone's curious, here we go. o/
    1: Talk about the first time you watched your favorite movie.
    2: Talk about your first kiss.
    3: Talk about the person you've had the most intense romantic feelings for.
    4: Talk about the thing you regret most so far.
    5: Talk about the best birthday you've had.
    6: Talk about the worst birthday you've had.
    7: Talk about your biggest insecurity.
    8: Talk about the thing you are most proud of.
    9: Talk about little things on your body that you like the most.
    10: Talk about the biggest fight you've ever had.
    11: Talk about the best dream you've ever had.
    12: Talk about the worst dream you've ever had.
    13: Talk about the first time you had sex/how you imagine your first time.
    14: Talk about a vacation.
    15: Talk about the time you were most content in life.
    16: Talk about the best party you've ever been to.
    17: Talk about someone you want to be friends with.
    18: Talk about something that happened in elementary school.
    19: Talk about something that happened in middle school.
    20: Talk about something that happened in high school.
    21: Talk about a time you had to turn someone down.
    22: Talk about your worst fear.
    23: Talk about a time someone turned you down.
    24: Talk about something someone told you that meant a lot.
    25: Talk about an ex-best friend.
    26: Talk about things you do when you're sick.
    27: Talk about your favorite part of someone else's body.
    28: Talk about your fetishes.
    29: Talk about what turns you on.
    30: Talk about what turns you off.
    31: Talk about what you think death is like.
    32: Talk about a place you remember from your childhood.
    33: Talk about what you do when you are sad.
    34: Talk about the worst physical pain you've endured.
    35: Talk about things you wish you could stop doing.
    36: Talk about your guilty pleasures.
    37: Talk about someone you thought you were in love with.
    38: Talk about songs that remind you of certain people.
    39: Talk about things you wish you'd known earlier.
    40: Talk about the end of something in your life.

  3. Pelvic Exercises May Help His Sex Life – WebMD →

  4. endurancechick:

Love training with #2xu compressions. :)


Nice reminder for me to get to the bike trail and take some photos of the trail that I run.

    endurancechick:

    Love training with #2xu compressions. :)

    Nice reminder for me to get to the bike trail and take some photos of the trail that I run.

  5. acceleratedfitness:

    #fitness #strong #gymlife 

    (Source: deodomuique)

  6. fitblr-at-fifteen:

thenewnewyou:

Weight loss is a process. It is not a steady decrease in weight, there are both ups and downs. The only way to see results is to stuck with it. 
thenewnewyou.tumblr.com 

need this

    fitblr-at-fifteen:

    thenewnewyou:

    Weight loss is a process. It is not a steady decrease in weight, there are both ups and downs. The only way to see results is to stuck with it. 

    thenewnewyou.tumblr.com 

    need this

  7. theworldofchinese:


Nunchaku Wielding Water Delivery Guy Kicks Thief’s Ass
The ancient Chinese idiom real masters are just hermits amidst the common people, certainly rang true at Foshan Institute of Technology in Guangdong Province, recently. A man delivering water on campus struck fear into the heart of a bike thief,  and went on to obliterate him while wielding nunchakus. Sina News reports:
Continue reading here…

    theworldofchinese:

    Nunchaku Wielding Water Delivery Guy Kicks Thief’s Ass

    The ancient Chinese idiom real masters are just hermits amidst the common people, certainly rang true at Foshan Institute of Technology in Guangdong Province, recently. A man delivering water on campus struck fear into the heart of a bike thief,  and went on to obliterate him while wielding nunchakus. Sina News reports:

    Continue reading here…

  8. wujifighter:

    gutsanduppercuts:

    Cecep Arif Rahman demonstrating the somewhat bizarre and yet highly efficient groundwork found in Silat.

    Granted, if you don’t speak the language - like me - you won’t understand what’s being said but it’s easy to grasp the concepts.
    Watch how he utilizes every part of his body, essentially using his arse as a pivot. He knows exactly where each limb is in relation to his opponent. Great, great stuff.

    And yes, he uses this in “The Raid 2.”

    Such incredible knowledge of body mechanics, and use of every limb..

  9. Good night, Tumblrs. Ya’ll have a great day / evening / or such.

  10. emphasisonthehomo:

    Queer subtext in media is nice and all, but have you considered:

    • Including actual queer characters instead of vague metaphors for queer characters.

    EDIT: Never mind I’m stupid and it’s passed my bed time. Duh. Now I remember who you’re talking about.

  11. manwithoutborders:

    shaped-by-karate:

    stepnsteph:

    shaped-by-karate:

    manwithoutborders:

    shaped-by-karate:

    road-to-fitness17:

    manwithoutborders:

    shaped-by-karate:

    This is sports karate. Karate that does not work if you’re going to fight the way you do at a tournament. If you think sports karate is effective in a fight, no… just no.

    And before somebody goes “but they’re noobies”…. notice that the boxers are noobies, too.

    I entered a tourney… Came at the opponent like a boxer.. He didn’t know what to do. Threw done easily blockage strikes and i roundhouse the open ribs… Catches my kick and i counter his throw… Dislocating his collar bone.

    Penalty.

    He comes back and ends up winning on points in 4 minutes… But i had finished the fight in less than 15 seconds.

    The only way “sport karate” would not work in a street fight is if you don’t understand the application. Notice hear in the video the person doing Karate is not padded up and avoiding face contact. Anyone of those round kicks to the chin and the boxer is out.
    Point fighting evolved from the basis that the first technique will either end the fight, or inflict enough damage to wear you can get away.

    That’s not what you learn in sports karate, though, as it can be clearly seen in the video… and what does it matter, the boxers still knocked them on their butts. They were fighting the way they were taught, light contact or no contact, karate for sport, and they are doing it, clearly, in a contact fight. You can’t go any dumber than that.

    I’m not saying techniques are wrong, or that sports karate doesn’t teach application… it’s just that they train for competition, so a lot of these “martial artists” don’t really even know how to properly hit. They can strike hard, sure, but a lot of them don’t know how to apply it to have real stopping power.

    And the reason why sports karate doesn’t work is because it’s for sport, nothing more than point sparring (talking about competition driven styles here). That’s why it’s called sports karate, it’s about speed, who touches the other first. They train like that for years and then “retire” out of the sport when they become a black belt. Those who stay end up teaching the same thing over and over, aerobics, punch, kick, punch, kick, this is how you go in and make a point, lets go to a competition.

    Sure it takes time and dedication, it’s takes stamina and skill, but that, in no way, makes it effective. Against someone who knows nothing of fighting, maybe. Then again, someone who knows nothing about fighting gets angry and out of control, sports karateka gets confused, because “that’s not how you’re supposed to fight”.

    In the end, as they get older, most lose all their ability to time, and say things like “wow, I miss my old dojo, maybe I’ll go back” but never do, or things like “Yeah, I got a black belt, but I retired” or they are always talking about how many “fights” they’ve won during their “career” and how they beat this black belt and that other black belt that supposedly are so good, but they won 5-0, but they don’t realize they only won, because of the competitions rules and regulations, speed and point sparring, not because they are good at fighting and applying techniques and power.

    When people talk like that about karate, that’s not karate. They are doing a sport that simulates karate. A lot of great teachers have fallen into this type of commercialized karate and teach little to no karate at all. The only thing they keep alive is kata and even that is getting lost, by making them over the top flashy and absurd, losing completely it’s meaning. Not to mention the extreme martial arts, which took that even further into the “this makes no sense” realm, and still dare to call it karate.

    I understand that things change, and all that, but just because “that’s how it’s done now” “evolution” “get with the times” and all that crap, doesn’t mean it’s the right way to go with karate.

    All it’s doing is breeding more and more athletes that end up “retiring” before even understanding what martial arts are about, instead of forging and shaping their minds and bodies into martial artists.

    I’ve had the luxury of training in different schools, one that taught fundamentals and pounded them into you. The other teachers sport mainly (it does much on fundamentals too).

    The big difference is time actually spent hitting something. In the first school, a third of the class was bag work. You learn how much your technique changes when you are trying to hit something… you overexert, you force, you over extend. You learn to strike the air in the same way that you would strike the bag/opponent. You roll your wrist from hitting wrong,  you stub your toes from bad positioning, you feel what its like to be hit through holding a bag. You learn to breathe with the strike. The worst thing about this approach is that you don’t really spar with someone because you are going all out, all the time.

    My favorite thing in this class. “Was someone in this room faster than you? If so, then you are dead.”

    The second school teaches how to score points and how to effectively get the first hit. The best thing is you learn how to see the opponent. The worst thing is that you never hit anything with intent…aside from some flashy kicks on a heavy bag… never a punch into a target. I disagree with the concept of two people striking at the same time and the faster person wins. In real life…both are dead. You just stabbed each other…only one faster. In real life the goal is to NOT get hit.

    My favorite thing about this class. “Make them think they got you. Then get them.”

    There needs to be a bit of both, but sport is missing the INTENT and fundamentals is missing the ESSENCE.  I like that I train in both.

    You can still spar in karate, though. It’s pretty different, though, and to do it right, both need to have great control.

    Missing the essence… you couldn’t have put it better. There is no “way of” in sports karate.

    It’s as I / we always say, “You fight how you train”.

    ^ yup

    I train to kill… makes sparring a little difficult… you fear your power. Its why the sport aspect makes a nice counterbalance. Hit just enough for point, no real contact….its like…ignore that power and just become a lightning bolt. 

    I’d imagine it does. I’ve never trained specifically to kill. My focus has always been on inflicting injury, taking down, or otherwise subduing 1 - 3 attackers. Observing certain civilian laws, but I’m not a military man.

    I have sometimes wondered if I could kill if I needed to. I suspect so due to a couple of reasons, but my own training may limit that short of a neck strike or a couple of take downs that I’ve practiced.

  12. 14 April 2014

    52 notes

    Reblogged from
    namalam

    Black Belt Magazine →

    shaped-by-karate:

    captainjaymerica:

    shaped-by-karate:

    namalam:

    Myths and Misconceptions

    10 Tall Tales of the Martial Arts Debunked!
    by Jonathan Maberry

    A Black Belt Is a Master
    Not even close. A first-degree black belt is an advanced beginner. The belt signifies his passage from the ranks of those who are still learning to the ranks of those who’ve learned how to learn. That’s a significant difference.

    The transition from white belt to black belt has less to do with techniques than with learning the methodology and procedures necessary to think like a martial artist. A black belt should be able to grasp the concepts on which the arts are based, which is far more important than his ability to perform any technique. There’s a saying about human survival: Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day, but teach a man to fish and you feed him for life. This is similar to the climb from colored belt to black belt: The black belt has learned how to learn and therefore becomes more proactive in his own education.

    Does this mean he’s an expert? Well, my colleagues in the martial arts are evenly split on that point. One point of view is: Yes, a first-degree black belt is an expert on the basic gross motor skills necessary to perform martial arts moves. The other is: No, a first-degree black belt is not an expert but an advanced beginner who’s just grasping the concepts he’ll need to become an expert within a few years.

    Most of the traditional instructors I know maintain that a person becomes a true expert by the time he reaches third degree, which is for many arts the point at which a person can begin teaching.

    These days, first- and second-degree black belts are often assigned to teach, and many are even called sensei. This marketing tactic confuses the issue, especially when younger students learn to equate anyone with a black belt with instructor-level expertise.
    I really like the idea of defining a first-degree black belt as an “advanced beginner”.  I read this article shortly before my test, and the truth of it resonates now that I’ve passed.

    Very true. Attaining a black belt means nothing more than the fact that you know the basics.

    This is why I find it ridiculous when people talk about being black belts, but “retiring”. Like there’s an end to it all.

    You don’t retire from martial arts. It isn’t a job or a career; it’s a lifestyle.

    ^ Exactly

  13. shaped-by-karate:

    manwithoutborders:

    shaped-by-karate:

    road-to-fitness17:

    manwithoutborders:

    shaped-by-karate:

    This is sports karate. Karate that does not work if you’re going to fight the way you do at a tournament. If you think sports karate is effective in a fight, no… just no.

    And before somebody goes “but they’re noobies”…. notice that the boxers are noobies, too.

    I entered a tourney… Came at the opponent like a boxer.. He didn’t know what to do. Threw done easily blockage strikes and i roundhouse the open ribs… Catches my kick and i counter his throw… Dislocating his collar bone.

    Penalty.

    He comes back and ends up winning on points in 4 minutes… But i had finished the fight in less than 15 seconds.

    The only way “sport karate” would not work in a street fight is if you don’t understand the application. Notice hear in the video the person doing Karate is not padded up and avoiding face contact. Anyone of those round kicks to the chin and the boxer is out.
    Point fighting evolved from the basis that the first technique will either end the fight, or inflict enough damage to wear you can get away.

    That’s not what you learn in sports karate, though, as it can be clearly seen in the video… and what does it matter, the boxers still knocked them on their butts. They were fighting the way they were taught, light contact or no contact, karate for sport, and they are doing it, clearly, in a contact fight. You can’t go any dumber than that.

    I’m not saying techniques are wrong, or that sports karate doesn’t teach application… it’s just that they train for competition, so a lot of these “martial artists” don’t really even know how to properly hit. They can strike hard, sure, but a lot of them don’t know how to apply it to have real stopping power.

    And the reason why sports karate doesn’t work is because it’s for sport, nothing more than point sparring (talking about competition driven styles here). That’s why it’s called sports karate, it’s about speed, who touches the other first. They train like that for years and then “retire” out of the sport when they become a black belt. Those who stay end up teaching the same thing over and over, aerobics, punch, kick, punch, kick, this is how you go in and make a point, lets go to a competition.

    Sure it takes time and dedication, it’s takes stamina and skill, but that, in no way, makes it effective. Against someone who knows nothing of fighting, maybe. Then again, someone who knows nothing about fighting gets angry and out of control, sports karateka gets confused, because “that’s not how you’re supposed to fight”.

    In the end, as they get older, most lose all their ability to time, and say things like “wow, I miss my old dojo, maybe I’ll go back” but never do, or things like “Yeah, I got a black belt, but I retired” or they are always talking about how many “fights” they’ve won during their “career” and how they beat this black belt and that other black belt that supposedly are so good, but they won 5-0, but they don’t realize they only won, because of the competitions rules and regulations, speed and point sparring, not because they are good at fighting and applying techniques and power.

    When people talk like that about karate, that’s not karate. They are doing a sport that simulates karate. A lot of great teachers have fallen into this type of commercialized karate and teach little to no karate at all. The only thing they keep alive is kata and even that is getting lost, by making them over the top flashy and absurd, losing completely it’s meaning. Not to mention the extreme martial arts, which took that even further into the “this makes no sense” realm, and still dare to call it karate.

    I understand that things change, and all that, but just because “that’s how it’s done now” “evolution” “get with the times” and all that crap, doesn’t mean it’s the right way to go with karate.

    All it’s doing is breeding more and more athletes that end up “retiring” before even understanding what martial arts are about, instead of forging and shaping their minds and bodies into martial artists.

    I’ve had the luxury of training in different schools, one that taught fundamentals and pounded them into you. The other teachers sport mainly (it does much on fundamentals too).

    The big difference is time actually spent hitting something. In the first school, a third of the class was bag work. You learn how much your technique changes when you are trying to hit something… you overexert, you force, you over extend. You learn to strike the air in the same way that you would strike the bag/opponent. You roll your wrist from hitting wrong,  you stub your toes from bad positioning, you feel what its like to be hit through holding a bag. You learn to breathe with the strike. The worst thing about this approach is that you don’t really spar with someone because you are going all out, all the time.

    My favorite thing in this class. “Was someone in this room faster than you? If so, then you are dead.”

    The second school teaches how to score points and how to effectively get the first hit. The best thing is you learn how to see the opponent. The worst thing is that you never hit anything with intent…aside from some flashy kicks on a heavy bag… never a punch into a target. I disagree with the concept of two people striking at the same time and the faster person wins. In real life…both are dead. You just stabbed each other…only one faster. In real life the goal is to NOT get hit.

    My favorite thing about this class. “Make them think they got you. Then get them.”

    There needs to be a bit of both, but sport is missing the INTENT and fundamentals is missing the ESSENCE.  I like that I train in both.

    You can still spar in karate, though. It’s pretty different, though, and to do it right, both need to have great control.

    Missing the essence… you couldn’t have put it better. There is no “way of” in sports karate.

    It’s as I / we always say, “You fight how you train”.

  14. crisilla:

    Why do people expect me to be sexual just because of the way I am?

    It really pisses me off how people would rather treat me as a fetish or a fantasy then an actual person.

    People think just because I was born male & dress feminine that they’re allowed to ask me stupid questions such as how big my dick is, how I like to have sex, etc.

    Note to guys :

    Trans people aren’t nymphos who are here for your pleasure and enjoyment. We aren’t here to please you and sure as hell aren’t here for your experimentation. 

    We are people. Treat us with respect. You wouldn’t walk up to a biological girl and ask how big her tits are or how she likes to get plowed. And if you do, you’re pretty pathetic.

    I just needed to write this somewhere since I’m sick of all this bullshit.

    It’s been awhile since I’ve reblogged / posted LGBTQ, but THIS ^^^^ is always worth dashboard time.